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11 Comments

  1. Matt Preiss
    August 2, 2017 @ 12:40

    I have had a very similar experience. My first trip to Iceland was with the EM10ii (only with kit lenses at the time)and was used as a second back up camera only. The last trip, I brought the EM1ii and the EM10ii, 7-14, 12-40 and 40-150mm PRO lenses. I mainly used the 7-14mm and 40-150mm. The 12-40 was hardly used. I also used the 45mm f1.8 and 60mm Macro, but sparingly.I have got a full filter set from NISI which has been exceptional and there is a an adapter that works with the 7-14mm without issue.

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    • John Salvino
      August 18, 2017 @ 15:32

      Hi Matt! Funny how we had such a similar experience! I’m curious to hear about which 7-14mm adapter your are using for your Nisi filters, which one did you choose?

      Reply

      • Matt Preiss
        September 16, 2017 @ 08:50

        Hi John, sorry for the delay, things have been a bit hectic! I use the adapter that Phil Norton has designed. Are you familiar with it?

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        • John Salvino
          September 22, 2017 @ 20:12

          Hi Matt! That seems to be the most popular option, I will probably end up going with that one as well! Thanks for letting me know.

          Reply

  2. Julia
    August 18, 2017 @ 06:35

    Hey there! I’d love to hear more about why you guys (John the writer, and Matt the commenter) haven’t used your 12-40 as much as you’d think. I mean, I love what I’ve seen of the 7-14, but I’m not sure I could afford both it and an Iceland trip 🙂 I have the EM1+12-40, and so far I have rarely ever wished for anything else on my camera (have been leaving my Panny 45-150 and primes at home for almost 6 months now and not missed them). I know the 7-14 can give very dramatic perspectives at the wide end, but are all suited/necessary for everything Iceland has to offer? Honestly curious to hear more about it.

    As for “noting down thoughts on a daily basis”, as you mentioned at the end, John, I can wholeheartedly recommend DayOne app if you’re on iOS or the Mac. I’ve been using it since it came out in 2011 and I’m always happy to go back and read what I wrote every day during my Norway/Italy/etc trips … if I was tired at the end of the day, I at least quickly jotted down a few stray thoughts that helped me flesh out a more detailed account the next morning over coffee 🙂

    Thanks for sharing your images and story, much appreciated!

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    • John Salvino
      August 18, 2017 @ 15:45

      Hi Julia! For me, not using my 12-40 very much wasn’t always conscious decision I was making while I was there taking pictures, it just kind of happened. Often times I just found myself so up close or so far away from things, that the wide or tele lenses just made more sense. That was the first (and so far, only) time I travelled with all three of those lenses, so I’m curious myself to see how my lens selection will go on my next trip!

      And as for Day One, thanks for the recommendation, I’ve actually had that app since 2012 myself as well, I just find myself going long periods of time (including the trip!) without using it! I need to be more disciplined when it comes to keeping a journal, like you said, it’s so valuable to have later on when you want to look back.

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      • Julia
        August 18, 2017 @ 16:22

        Thanks for your reply, John! I hope to see more of your posts here, this one was really amazing and I’m curious to see how your lens usage will develop over time. And good luck with getting into the journaling habit 🙂 I’ve actually set up a weekly reminder to get me into the app and catch up; hopefully that will make me a more regular note taker, too 🙂

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        • John Salvino
          August 23, 2017 @ 15:56

          Thanks for your kind words, Julia! That’s a great idea, and good luck with keeping up your journaling!

          Reply

    • John Pendleton
      September 22, 2017 @ 21:19

      Julia —
      The 7-14mm absolutely excels at the travel phog staple, the environmental “establishing shot.” And it just so happens Iceland is chock full of opportunities for those. So that’s why the wide angle lens can get maybe more heavily used. But the 12-14mm is still unmatched for closer people and object shots, as the whole “street photography” focal range is just OWNED by that lens.

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  3. John Pendleton
    August 25, 2017 @ 18:11

    Great shots, and you found out the same things I did in mid-February of this year, in many of the same locations (hello, top of Hallgrímskirkja!) ! I had my E-M1 II and the M.Zuiko PRO “zoom trinity,” as well as the 8mm PRO fisheye. The 12-40mm generally got the LEAST use, except I was glad I had it for a night walk along the harbor, since the Imagine Peace Tower was lit up across the water, a rare sight, and it had both enough range and aperture to capture the environment perfectly — including the lit-up Harpa, then hosting the SONAR Festival. I was quite smug as I openly worked the E-M1 II and 7-14mm through a day-long “Game of Thrones” tour, braving the rain at Þingvellir while everyone else desperately held plastic bags round their cameras. And I also found the Urban Approach 15 to be the ideal bag for this system. That rain hood was invaluable for long slogs between transit points, and always fit under the IcelandAir seat in front of me, even on the aisle. I did take a smaller camera (the LX10) as my backup and for the no-bulky, more casual outings, where you’re recommending the iPhone. But you’re right about seeing this as a “trip of a lifetime” so you don’t want to NOT take any options. I did use everything, but I also packed a smaller camera bag in my luggage for flexibility. And I now believe Iceland is the reason carbon-fiber tripods were invented.
    One thought about Iceland in winter: if you’re going exclusively for the Northern Lights, plan multiple options, including a night tour with a “guarantee.” My captured Iceland experience was quite cloudy, even at night. The Aurora was there, just not visible where WE were at any given time. So go for everything else (and for the god’s sakes, get away from the crowds in Reykjavik for a bit so you won’t feel so much like “part of the problem,” am I right?) but accept the Northern Lights as a lucky blessing if you’re able to shoot them. And take a combination of long underwear and rain gear. Layers, layers, and more layers. Even for your batteries. You’ll find it’s not necessarily the cold if you’ve packed correctly … it’s the wet, just like in the summer.

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    • John Salvino
      September 22, 2017 @ 20:12

      Hi John!

      It’s funny that we both had such a similar experience in Iceland! As I mentioned, I was so glad to have waterproof equipment, I had the same feeling as you while watching others struggle to hide their equipment from the wet weather. And like you said, I found the best parts of the trip were the days spent away from Reykjavik, when you feel you have the entire island to yourself!

      Thanks for all the great tips about winter in Iceland, I hope one day I will be able to make use of them! I agree, you have to hope for the best, but make sure to enjoy the trip even if you end up not seeing the Northern Lights, can’t let that ruin the entire trip. It’s all part of the journey right!?

      Reply

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